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Alireza Asadpoure

Assistant Professor

Civil & Environmental Engineering
Textiles 225

508-990-9652
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Dr. Asadpoure is a faculty member in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. He received his PhD in structural mechanics from the Department of Civil Engineering at the Johns Hopkins University. His research experience and interests are in the field of computational mechanics with emphasis on stochastic modeling and optimization of complex systems and materials. Dr. Asadpoure develops design methodologies by incorporating advanced stochastic modeling and applied statistical methods into design topology optimization resulting in materials and systems with unprecedented performance. His research includes robust and reliable device/component/system designs considering a wide range of constraints in their manufacturing, vibration, stability and/or cross physical properties.


Alfa Heryudono

Associate Professor

Mathematics
Liberal Arts 394H

508-999-8516
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Arghavan Louhghalam

Assistant Professor

Civil & Environmental Engineering
Textiles 210

508-999-8491
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Dr. Arghavan Louhghalam joined the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering as an assistant professor. Prior to joining the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, she was a postdoctoral research associate at Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Concrete Sustainability Hub (CSHub@MIT). She holds a Ph.D. and a M.S. in Engineering Mechanics from the Johns Hopkins University, a M.S. in Earthquake Engineering from University of Tehran, and a B.S. in Civil and Environmental Engineering from Iran University of Science and Technology, Iran. 

Dr. Louhghalam’s research interests are mainly focused on interconnected areas of solid mechanics, material modeling and applied statistics with applications to the development of sustainable and resilient civil infrastructure. Her research on quantitative engineering sustainability aims at development of mechanics-based predictive tools to quantify the environmental impact of civil infrastructures and identify the key contributing factors to this footprint.


Amit Tandon

Professor

Mechanical Engineering
School for Marine Science & Technology East, New Bedford 234

508-999-8357
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Dr. Tandon uses his knowledge of Fluid Mechanics and Physical Oceanography to address myriad of problems involving mixing processes in the upper ocean. He uses analytical and numerical modeling to address the importance of mixing and mixed layer processes for ocean circulation and climate. He has also supervised graduate students on basic experimental fluid mechanics projects. His research interests span from small- scale turbulence and oceanic mixed- layer processes, to sub-mesoscale frontal gradients and mesoscale eddies, and their role in setting up the large scale balances in the ocean.

His research publications have involved processes in oceanic mixed layers and submesoscale eddies, their role in water mass formation and parameterization of mesoscale processes for their direct impact on problems of climate interest. His peer reviewed publications have appeared in Journal of Physical Oceanography, Ocean Modelling, Science (Online), Deep Sea Research, Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans, Journal of Fluid Mechanics and Physica-D. 


Amit Tandon

Professor

SMAST / Estuarine & Ocean Sciences
School for Marine Science & Technology East, New Bedford 234

508-999-8357
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Dr. Tandon uses his knowledge of Fluid Mechanics and Physical Oceanography to address myriad of problems involving mixing processes in the upper ocean. He uses analytical and numerical modeling to address the importance of mixing and mixed layer processes for ocean circulation and climate. He has also supervised graduate students on basic experimental fluid mechanics projects. His research interests span from small- scale turbulence and oceanic mixed- layer processes, to sub-mesoscale frontal gradients and mesoscale eddies, and their role in setting up the large scale balances in the ocean.

His research publications have involved processes in oceanic mixed layers and submesoscale eddies, their role in water mass formation and parameterization of mesoscale processes for their direct impact on problems of climate interest. His peer reviewed publications have appeared in Journal of Physical Oceanography, Ocean Modelling, Science (Online), Deep Sea Research, Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans, Journal of Fluid Mechanics and Physica-D. 


Banafsheh Seyedaghazadeh

Assistant Professor

Mechanical Engineering
Science & Engineering 116C

508-999-8567
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Dr. Banafsheh Seyed-Aghazadeh is an assistant professor at the Mechanical Engineering department and the director of “Laboratory for Fluid-Structure Interactions Studies (FSI Lab)” at University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. Before joining UMassD, was the James R. Myers Endowed assistant professor at Miami University. Dr. Banafsheh Seyed-Aghazadeh is a proud UMass Alumna. She received her PhD from University of Massachusetts Amherst; her master’s and bachelor’s degrees from University of Tabriz, Iran, in Mechanical Engineering. Dr. Banafsheh Seyed-Aghazadeh research focuses on Fluid-Structure Interactions (FSI), which combines fluid dynamics research with ideas on advanced nonlinear dynamics.

FSI has significant implications for a number of physical systems, from aeolian harps to power transmission lines, towing cables, undersea pipelines, drilling risers and mooring lines used to stabilize offshore floating platforms. At FSI lab, Dr. Banafsheh Seyed-Aghazadeh research group works on designing flow-induced vibration-based energy harvesters from external sources available in the environment, such as wind or marine currents. Her research group also works on investigating potentials of combining fundamentals of flow-induced vibration with machine learning algorithms, to lay the foundation for future research projects in the area of biomimetic fluidic sensor design with applications in ocean sensing. Such projects can directly advance the UMass Dartmouth’s role in building the blue economy through initiation of innovative and collaborative research projects at SouthCoast of Massachusetts.


Caiwei Shen

Assistant Professor

Mechanical Engineering
Textiles 211

508-999-8449
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Dr. Caiwei Shen received the B.S. degree in electronic engineering and the M.S. degree in microelectronics from Tsinghua University in 2010 and 2013, respectively. He received the Ph.D. degree in mechanical engineering from University of California at Berkeley in 2018. He joined the Mechanical Engineering department at University of Massachusetts Dartmouth as assistant professor in the same year. He is teaching materials science courses for both undergraduate and graduate students. His research focuses on materials and technologies for energy-related applications and various sensors and actuators. He is currently interested in developing flexible and wearable supercapacitors and multifunctional structural energy storage devices. He is also interested in the synthesis of nanomaterials and the development of biomimetic or bio-related sensors and actuators.


David Brown

Professor

Center for Innovation & Entrepreneurship
Center for Innovation & Entrepreneurship, Fall River 123

508-910-9852
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David A. Brown, Professor, Dept. Electrical & Comp. Engineering and Adjunct in Physics and Mechanical Engineering at UMass Dartmouth. Prof. Brown obtained his MS and PhD in 1989/91 from the US Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Engineering Acoustics in Depts. of Physics and Electrical Engineering while working on optical fiber interferometric detection of underwater sound. He has more than three-decades of experience in the areas of Optical and Electrical Acoustics including transducer modeling and calibration of underwater sensors and sources. He has more than 200 papers, conference presentations and reports. He has taught specialized courses in fundamentals of acoustics, vibration and sound, underwater acoustics, electroacoustics, nonlinear acoustics, electromagnetics, fiber optics, and medical ultrasonic as faculty at UMass Dartmouth, Brown University, NUWC and the Naval Postgraduate School. Prof. Brown’s main interest is in preparing future scientists and engineers for the field of Acoustic Transduction, which has been identified as a Critical DoD Technology area by the Department of Commerce and DoD. He previously had ten years of experience working as an Acoustical Scientist/Engineer for Navy DoD (NPS and NUWC) as an expert in underwater acoustic transduction so is very aware of practical navy research and operational needs. He has secured funding >$4M which includes support for undergraduate and graduate MS/PhD students in navy related optics and acoustic problems. Dr. Brown was also involved in the founding, development and instrumentation of the university’s unique underwater acoustics/optics test facility (UWTF) and the creation of the ATMC/CIE Center for Advanced Technology and Manufacturing, now Innovation and Entrepreneurship. Dr. Brown was elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA) in 2013 in recognition for contributions to fiber-optic and piezoelectric transduction science, and leadership in acoustics education, and was a past Associate Editor for Acoustic Transduction, Acoustical Measurements, Instrumentation, and Applied Acoustics. He is a member of the three Technical Specialization Committees on Physical Acoustics, Engineering Acoustics, and Education in Acoustics for the ASA. He is also the President of the regional chapter of the ASA, the Southern New England (Narragansett) Chapter of the ASA society.


David Brown

Professor

Electrical & Computer Engineering
Dion 319D

508-999-8479
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David A. Brown, Professor, Dept. Electrical & Comp. Engineering and Adjunct in Physics and Mechanical Engineering at UMass Dartmouth. Prof. Brown obtained his MS and PhD in 1989/91 from the US Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Engineering Acoustics in Depts. of Physics and Electrical Engineering while working on optical fiber interferometric detection of underwater sound. He has more than three-decades of experience in the areas of Optical and Electrical Acoustics including transducer modeling and calibration of underwater sensors and sources. He has more than 200 papers, conference presentations and reports. He has taught specialized courses in fundamentals of acoustics, vibration and sound, underwater acoustics, electroacoustics, nonlinear acoustics, electromagnetics, fiber optics, and medical ultrasonic as faculty at UMass Dartmouth, Brown University, NUWC and the Naval Postgraduate School. Prof. Brown’s main interest is in preparing future scientists and engineers for the field of Acoustic Transduction, which has been identified as a Critical DoD Technology area by the Department of Commerce and DoD. He previously had ten years of experience working as an Acoustical Scientist/Engineer for Navy DoD (NPS and NUWC) as an expert in underwater acoustic transduction so is very aware of practical navy research and operational needs. He has secured funding >$4M which includes support for undergraduate and graduate MS/PhD students in navy related optics and acoustic problems. Dr. Brown was also involved in the founding, development and instrumentation of the university’s unique underwater acoustics/optics test facility (UWTF) and the creation of the ATMC/CIE Center for Advanced Technology and Manufacturing, now Innovation and Entrepreneurship. Dr. Brown was elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA) in 2013 in recognition for contributions to fiber-optic and piezoelectric transduction science, and leadership in acoustics education, and was a past Associate Editor for Acoustic Transduction, Acoustical Measurements, Instrumentation, and Applied Acoustics. He is a member of the three Technical Specialization Committees on Physical Acoustics, Engineering Acoustics, and Education in Acoustics for the ASA. He is also the President of the regional chapter of the ASA, the Southern New England (Narragansett) Chapter of the ASA society.


Dayalan Kasilingam

Professor

Electrical & Computer Engineering
Science & Engineering 213C

508-999-8534
dkasilingam@umassd.edu

Dr. Dayalan Kasilingam received the B.A. degree in electrical sciences from the University of Cambridge, Cambridge, U.K., in 1981 and the M.S.E.E. and Ph.D. degrees from the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, in 1982 and 1987, respectively. From 1987 to 1992, he was the Senior Research Scientist with Ocean Research and Engineering, Pasadena, where he developed numerous techniques for analyzing and retrieving information from synthetic aperture radar images of the ocean surface. In January 1993, Dr. Kasilingam joined the department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. Dr. Kasilingam’s research interest is in radar remote sensing and applied electromagnetics. He received the prestigious Faculty Early Career Development Grant from the National Science Foundation in 1995. He has also been awarded research grants from the Office of Naval Research and NASA. From September 2005 through May 2014, he was the Chairperson of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Dr. Kasilingam has also performed sabbaticals at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in Washington, DC, and at the Center for Remote Imaging, Sensing and Processing at the National University of Singapore (NUS).


Daniel MacDonald

Professor

SMAST / Estuarine & Ocean Sciences
School for Marine Science & Technology East, New Bedford 233

508-910-6334
dmacdonald@umassd.edu

At UMass Dartmouth, Dr. MacDonald leads the Coastal Engineering and Fluid Mechanics Laboratory, which focuses research in a variety of areas related to coastal physics and engineering. Basic and applied research encompasses the areas of stratified hydrodynamics, turbulence and frontal dynamics—with specific emphasis on estuarine flows, river plumes, and industrial discharges. A significant research focus also lies in the area of renewable energy, including wave energy and the hydrodynamic aspects of other marine renewable technologies, and conventional hydropower. He is also actively involved in the utilization of robotic platforms for environmental data acquisition in coastal and inland aquatic environments.

Dr. MacDonald is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers and American Geophysical Union.

 


Daniel MacDonald

Professor

Civil & Environmental Engineering
Violette Research 107B

508-910-6334
dmacdonald@umassd.edu

At UMass Dartmouth, Dr. MacDonald leads the Coastal Engineering and Fluid Mechanics Laboratory, which focuses research in a variety of areas related to coastal physics and engineering. Basic and applied research encompasses the areas of stratified hydrodynamics, turbulence and frontal dynamics—with specific emphasis on estuarine flows, river plumes, and industrial discharges. A significant research focus also lies in the area of renewable energy, including wave energy and the hydrodynamic aspects of other marine renewable technologies, and conventional hydropower. He is also actively involved in the utilization of robotic platforms for environmental data acquisition in coastal and inland aquatic environments.

Dr. MacDonald is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers and American Geophysical Union.

 


Geoffrey Cowles

Associate Professor

SMAST / Fisheries Oceanography
School for Marine Science & Technology East, New Bedford 218

508-910-6397
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Dr. Cowles is a Professor in the Department of Fisheries Oceanography at University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. He is the director of the Computational Modeling Lab (CMLAB) at the School for Marine Science and Technology. His research is focused on applied computing at a wide range of scales which include problems in coastal ocean and wave modeling, ship hydrodynamics, and free surface flows. Dr. Cowles is currently working with students and colleagues on several projects including the development of improved techniques for the geolocation of demersal fish, evaluations of the contribution of wastewater to coastal acidification, multiscale modeling for tidal energy optimization, and biophysical modeling studies of the impacts of climate change on lobster recruitment in local waters.

His research is supported by the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Office of Naval Research (ONR), the Department of Energy (DOE), MIT Sea Grant, and Woods Hole Sea Grant.


Hangjian Ling

Assistant Professor

Mechanical Engineering
Violette Research 214

508-999-8540
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Dr. Ling is currently an Assistant Professor in Mechanical Engineering at University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. He received his Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University in 2017, where he studies the drag reduction of super-hydrophobic surfaces in turbulent flows. Before joining UMass Dartmouth, he was a Postdoc at Stanford University from 2017 to 2019, where he studies the collective behavior of natural bird flocks.

Dr. Ling is broadly interested in fluid dynamic problems at the interface of material, biological and environmental sciences. His lab focuses on the development of novel imaging technologies to characterize fluid flows as well as animal movements in complex environments. His overarching goal is to uncover the underlying physical laws, and harness them to solve the critical energy and environmental issues in our society. His current research areas include:

  • Applications of bio-inspired superhydrophobic surfaces in marine engineering for anti-biofouling, anti-icing, and energy saving;
  • Biofouling and attachment mechanism of marine micro-organisms on roughed and bubbled surfaces;
  • Mechanism of drag and noise productions in turbulent boundary layers over high-speed vessels;
  • Mechanism of group cohesion maintenance by social animals in turbulent and uncertain environments;
  • Holographical imaging of human cells and cancer detection;
  • Long-term three-dimensional tracking and monitoring of the foraging actives of seabirds.

Dr. Ling’s work has been published in several high-impact journals including Nature Ecology and Evolution, and Nature Communications.


Hamed Samandari

Full-Time Lecturer

Mechanical Engineering
Science & Engineering 116D

508-910-6553
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Dr. Hamed Samandari is a Full-time Lecturer at the Mechanical Engineering Department at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth (UMassD). Prior to joining UMassD, Dr. Samandari served for three years as a Visiting Faculty at Miami University. Prior to his appointment with Miami University, he also spent a year as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Hamed received his B.Sc., M.Sc., and Ph.D. degrees, all in Mechanical Engineering, form Isfahan University of Technology in Iran, University of Tabriz in Iran, and Middle East Technical University in Turkey, respectively.

Hamed’s vision is to advance modeling, monitoring, and identification techniques with particular focus on exploiting nonlinearities, addressing unmet needs in a wide range of mechanical applications as well as biomedical applications. His research activities cover topics in Energy Systems, Bionic Systems, Vehicle Dynamics, Nonlinear Vibrations, and Nano scale electromechanical devices. Currently, Hamed is collaborating with interdisciplinary teams from industry, academia, and healthcare working on projects on:

  • Flow-induced Nonlinear Energy Harvesting
  • Personalized Volume Management in End-Stage Kidney Patients
  • Applied Computational Frameworks to Compute Nonlinear Normal Modes of Complex Structures

John Buck

Chancellor Professor

Electrical & Computer Engineering
Dion 324B

508-999-9237
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John R. Buck received his S.B. degrees in electrical engineering and humanities (English literature) from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1989, and subsequently received his S.M., E.E., and Ph.D. degrees from the MIT/WHOI Joint Program in Ocean and Electrical Engineering in 1991, 1992, and 1996, respectively.

In 1996, Dr. Buck joined the faculty of the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth where he is currently a professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. He also holds a joint appointment in the School for Marine Science and Technology. From 2003 to 2004, he was in Australia as a Fulbright Senior Scholar, hosted by the Defence Science and Technology Organisation and Sydney University. His textbook publications include "Discrete-Time Signal Processing, Second Edition" by Oppenheim and Schafer with Buck (Prentice-Hall, 1999) and "Computer Explorations in Signals and Systems Using Matlab (TM), Second Edition" by Buck, Daniel and Singer (Prentice-Hall, 2001). His research interests include signal processing, underwater acoustics, and marine mammal bioacoustics.

Dr. Buck received the Mac Van Valkenburg Early Career Teaching Award from the IEEE Education Society in 2005 and the Leo Sullivan Teacher of the Year award in 2008 from the UMass Dartmouth Faculty Federation. He is a past recipient of the ONR Young Investigator (2000) and NSF CAREER (1998) awards, as well as MIT's Goodwin Medal (1994) and the MIT EECS Department Carlton E. Tucker Teaching Award (1991). Dr. Buck is a member of the IEEE, the Acoustical Society of America, the American Society for Engineering Education, and Sigma Xi.


Kihan Park

Assistant Professor

Mechanical Engineering
Textiles 213

508-999-8549
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Kihan Park is an assistant professor of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. He received his Ph.D. degree in Robotics (Home Department: Biomedical Engineering) from Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, USA in 2019, B.S and M.S degrees in Mechanical Engineering from Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon, South Korea in 2009 and 2011, respectively. His primary research interests are design/control of robotic systems, micro-scale sensing/actuation, microfabrication, and machine learning for both medical and industrial applications.

He is a recipient of Korean governmental scholarship (USD 150,000) for his doctoral education and his works have been awarded to the best student paper from IEEE MARSS 2017 and the best conference paper finalist from IEEE BioRob 2011.


Mark Altabet

Professor / Chairperson

SMAST / Estuarine & Ocean Sciences
School for Marine Science & Technology West, New Bedford 122A

508-999-8622
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Maricris Mayes

Associate Professor

Chemistry & Biochemistry
Science & Engineering 311B

508-999-8420
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Maricris Mayes is currently an Associate Professor at the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Massachusetts. Dr. Mayes is an expert in the broad area of theoretical and computational chemistry. She has a strong background in electronic structure theory, where she contributed by developing new generations of coupled-cluster methods in which information about higher-order electron correlation effects was obtained from multireference many-body perturbation theory. She has extensive experience in large-scale computing and fragmentation methods while working at Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, using and benchmarking one of the world’s largest supercomputer for large-scale, fully quantum, and molecular dynamics calculations. She had also worked on studies of electron impact and photodissociation dynamics of methane using nonadiabatic trajectory surface hopping approaches as well as studies of the mechanical and optical properties of carbon nanotubes.

The Mayes research group is a computational chemistry and material science research group that focuses on developing and applying ab initio electronic structure methods and simulations to solve challenging problems related to energy and human health. Our research efforts are highly interdisciplinary and span quantum chemistry method and algorithmic development, molecular and reaction dynamics, computational organic chemistry and material science, and high-performance and large-scale computing. Specific projects that are currently underway include computational study of electrolytes for battery, early self-assembly of peptide-based functional nanomaterials, host-guest chemistry, and catalytic pathways and photochemistry of small organic molecules.


Mehdi Raessi

Associate Professor

Mechanical Engineering
Textiles 226

508-999-8496
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Mehdi Raessi joined the Mechanical Engineering Department in 2010 following a postdoctoral study at NASA-Stanford University's Center for Turbulence Research (CTR). He obtained his PhD in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Toronto in 2008. During his graduate studies, he worked in the Centre for Advanced Coating Technologies (CACT).

Dr. Raessi's research is primarily focused on numerical simulations of interfacial flows and two-phase flows with phase change. Using numerical simulations, he has been studying the fluid flow and heat transfer in various applications including energy systems (renewable and conventional), materials processing, and environmentally friendly refrigeration systems. In addition to academic research and teaching, Dr. Raessi has industrial experience as a research and development (R&D) specialist and applied engineer.

Awards

  • Postdoctoral Fellowship, NASA-Stanford University’s Center for Turbulence Research
  • Industrial Research and Development Fellowship, Government of Canada
  • Queen Elizabeth II Graduate Scholarship in Science and Technology, Government of Ontario, Canada
  • CFD Society of Canada Graduate Scholarship
  • Early Career Teaching Award, University of Toronto

Ming Shao

Assistant Professor

Computer & Information Science
Dion 303A

508-910-6893
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Ming Shao received B.E. degree in Computer Science, B.S. degree in Applied Mathematics, and M.E. degree in Computer Science from Beihang University, Beijing, China, in 2006, 2007, and 2010, respectively. He received Ph.D. degree in Computer Engineering from Northeastern University, Boston MA, 2016. He is a tenure-track Assistant Professor affiliated with College of Engineering at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth since 2016 Fall. His current research interests include predictive modeling, adversarial machine learning, robust visual representation learning, and health informatics. He was the recipient of the Presidential Fellowship of State University of New York at Buffalo from 2010 to 2012, and the best paper award winner of IEEE ICDM 2011 Workshop on Large Scale Visual Analytics, and best paper award candidate of ICME 2014. He has served as the reviewers for many IEEE Transactions journals including TPAMI, TKDE, TNNLS, TIP, and TMM. He has also served on the program committee for the conferences including AAAI, IJCAI, ECAI, CVPR, ICCV, ICLR, ICDM, IEEE BigData, CIKM, ACM-MM, etc. He is the Associate Editor of SPIE Journal of Electronic Imaging, and IEEE Computational Intelligence Magazine. He is a member of IEEE.


Miles Sundermeyer

Professor

SMAST / Estuarine & Ocean Sciences
School for Marine Science & Technology West, New Bedford 110A

508-999-8892
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Dr. Sundermeyer earned his B.A. in 1991 from the University of California Santa Cruz with a double major in Mathematics and Physics. He earned his Ph.D. in 1998 from the MIT/WHOI Joint Program in Physical Oceanography, where he studied processes controlling lateral dispersion in the ocean. Following his PhD, he worked for two years as a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for Marine Science and Technology at UMass Dartmouth performing numerical modeling related to fish stock assessment, before signing on as Faculty in 2001. With now more than 25 years’ experience studying problems relating to ocean mixing, Dr. Sundermeyer’s primary ongoing research interests include vertical and horizontal mixing processes, dye release and Lagrangian drifter studies, remote and autonomous sensing, numerical modeling of two- and three-dimensional turbulent flows, and numerical modeling of physical and biological interactions. His research combines observations with idealized analytical and numerical models to test hypotheses about specific physical oceanographic processes. To date he has spent more than 180 days at sea, with field observations serving as the foundation of his work. He then uses theoretical, numerical, and laboratory studies to understand the underlying physical processes that control ocean mixing. Dr. Sundermeyer has published more than 25 peer reviewed publications, and has authored/co-authored more than 75 conference presentations. As a Professor, he has advised or co-advised 10 MS students, and 6 PhD students, and served as an academic/thesis committee member for an additional 8 MS and 6 PhD students. He currently also serves as Graduate Program Director at the School for Marine Science and Technology / UMass Intercampus Marine Science program, and is also a long-time Guest/Visiting investigator at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.


Mazdak Tootkaboni

Associate Professor

Civil & Environmental Engineering
Textiles 219A

508-999-8465
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Mazdak P. Tootkaboni earned his high school diploma in mathematics and physics in June 1995. He then attended University of Tehran in Iran where he was awarded BSc in Civil Engineering and MSc in Earthquake engineering in April 2000 and December 2002 respectively. He joined the Department of Civil Engineering at the Johns Hopkins University in 2004 and earned his PhD degree in Structural Mechanics in May 2009.

Dr Tootkaboni’s research lies at the intersection of computational mechanics and applied probability and statistics. He develops schemes that combine recent advances in stochastic modeling (e.g. stochastic PDE solving techniques) and applied statistics (e.g. machine learning and statistical inference) with the existing methods in computational mechanics. These schemes have a wide range of applications, from uncertainty modeling (representation and propagation) to model validation and from reliability analysis to integration of experiments and computational models, and fault tolerant (uncertainty informed) design topology optimization. He is an associate member of ASCE and a member of Engineering Mechanics Institute (EMI) and its Probabilistic Mechanics Committee. 


Patrick Cappillino

Associate Professor

Chemistry & Biochemistry
Violette Research 201C

508-910-6639
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Patrick Cappillino received his Ph.D. in the areas of bioinorganic and synthetic inorganic chemistry from Boston University. His dissertation work focused on elucidating the important role of iron in oxygen-activating enzymes. He continued his research career as a postdoctoral appointee at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA. There he focused on the synthesis of nanoporous and nanostructured metals, as well as the application of transition metal compounds to electrochemical energy storage. Dr. Cappillino began a faculty post in the Chemistry Department at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth in the Fall of 2014. He has since initiated projects in critical areas of energy research, including grid-scale energy storage and novel materials for electrocatalysis. His areas of expertise include molecular and solid-state inorganic chemistry, meso- and nano-structured materials, electrochemistry, surface chemistry, and bioinorganic chemistry. Cappillino was a recipient of the 2015/16 Electrochemical Society/Toyota Young Investigator Fellowship and was recognized by the Journal of Materials Chemistry in their 2017 Emerging Investigators issue.


Paul Gendron

Associate Professor

Electrical & Computer Engineering
Science & Engineering 214D

508-999-8510
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Paul J. Gendron received his PhD from Worcester Polytechnic Institute, his MS from Viginia Tech and his BS from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, all in Electrical Engineering. His work is broad in the field of statistical signal processing, detection and estimation theory. His contributions range from seismic event detection and classification to adaptive filtering and low probability of detection acoustic communications. He was with the Naval Research Laboratory from 2000 to 2007 and with the Spawar Systems Center Pacific from 2008 to 2012. In 2000, he was the recipient of an Office of Naval Research research fellowship award for his work with the Acoustic Division at the Naval Research Laboratory. In 2006, he served as an Office of Naval Research Visiting Scientist at DRDC-Atlantic, Canada. Dr. Gendron presently conducts research for the Office of Naval Research related to the discover and invention of enabling technologies for undersea surveillance.


Pia Moisander

Associate Professor

Biology
Violette Research 209

508-999-8222
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Pia H. Moisander, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor at the Department of Biology at the UMassD, and holds an Affiliate position at the Department of Estuarine and Ocean Sciences, School of Marine Science and Technology. Dr. Moisander obtained her M.S. degree at the University of Helsinki, Finland and her Ph.D. in Marine Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the latter supported with an ASLA-Fulbright fellowship. She was awarded a National Research Council Research Associateship at the NASA Ames Research Center (Moffett Field, California), and then held a Postdoctoral Researcher and subsequent Assistant Researcher positions at the University of California Santa Cruz.

Her research is in the field of marine microbial ecology, with emphasis on the microbial influence and interactions with marine biogeochemical cycles; specifically, the nitrogen cycle. Her research combines molecular, genomic, microbiological, and biogeochemical approaches. Recently her laboratory has investigated marine zooplankton microbiomes and contributed to research in development of approaches for measurements of marine nitrogen fixation. Her laboratory has recently been participating in collaborative research projects developing novel and sustainable antifouling solutions to marine biofouling.

Dr. Moisander is an author of >50 peer-reviewed publications in journals including Science, The ISME Journal, and Environmental Microbiology. She serves as an associate editor for two journals and has served as a reviewer for numerous journals and many federal and non-federal grant programs. Dr. Moisander has received past grant support from sources including NSF Biological Oceanography, NSF Chemical Oceanography, NSF Division of Environmental Biology, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, USGS, US Department of Energy, and via contracts with several private and non-profit organizations.


Ruolin Zhou

Assistant Professor

Electrical & Computer Engineering
Science & Engineering 214B

508-910-6922
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Ruolin Zhou received her B.S. degree in electrical engineering from Dalian Jiaotong University, China in 2003; M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Wright State University in Dayton, OH in 2007 and 2012, respectively. She joined University of Massachusetts Dartmouth in September 2018. From August 2012 to August 2018, she was with Western New England University in Springfield, MA, where she was promoted to an Associate Professor with tenure granted in early of 2018. Her research interests and expertise include: FPGA based and Software Defined Radio (SDR) based intelligent RF systems, AI in dynamic spectrum access and management, hardware security, wireless communications, and data analytics. She has served as a Principle Investigator (PI) or Co-PI on several projects sponsored by DoD, Lockheed Martin, Xilinx, and Intel FPGA. She was the recipient of the 2010 Best Demo Award from IEEE Globecom, the flagship conference of IEEE Communication Society. Dr. Zhou served on the technical committees for several conferences such as SPIE – Defense and Commercial Sensing, Radar Sensor Technology in 2018 and 2019, IEEE Midwest Symposium on Circuits and Systems in 2017, and Workshop on Security, Reliability, and Resilience in Wireless Sensor Networks and Smart Grid in 2017, etc. She is an organizing committee member of IEEE Midwest Symposium on Circuits and Systems and EAI international Conference on Mobile Multimedia Communications in 2020.


Sigal Gottlieb

Chancellor Professor

Mathematics
Liberal Arts 394D

508-999-8205
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Vijaya Chalivendra

Professor / Graduate Program Director

Mechanical Engineering
Textiles 209

508-910-6572
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Dr. Chalivendra obtained his undergraduate degree and masters degree from Sri Venkateswara University College of Engineering, Tirupati, India in 1993 and 1997 respectively. He worked for two different industries: Bharat Electronics Ltd., and Tata Refractories Ltd., for two and half years in India before pursuing his doctoral degree at University of Rhode Island during 2000-2003. His doctoral dissertation is focused on analytical and experimental treatment of fracture studies in functionally graded materials. He developed analytical crack tip field equations for an arbitrarily oriented crack in functionally graded materials under both stationary and transient dynamic loading conditions. As a postdoctoral fellow at California Institute of Technology during 2003-2005, he conducted experimental investigation of well-controlled dynamic fragmentation studies for validation of large-scale simulations. He joined UMASS Dartmouth in 2005 and now serving as Professor in Mechanical Engineering Department. He is also currently serving as Graduate Program Director for the department. He published about 70 peer-reviewed journal articles and currently serving as a Technical Associate Editor for Experimental Mechanics journal. He was awarded about $2M external grant funding for conducting research for understanding materials behavior under various loading conditions at different length scales. He graduated sixteen masters students and one doctoral student from his research lab. He also trained 33 undergraduate students in his research lab and published 12 peer-reviewed articles with them as co-authors. His research interests include, Smart composite material, biological materials, nano-mechanical characterization of MEMs and polymers, high strain rate behavior, and impact characterization of sports helmets.


Wei-Shun Chang

Assistant Professor

Chemistry & Biochemistry
Dion 112

508-999-8247
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Wei-Shun Chang is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at UMass Dartmouth. He obtained B.S. and M.S. in Chemistry from National Taiwan University in 1996 and 1998, respective. After working in the semiconductor industry for a few years, he studied the electro-optical properties of conjugated polymer supervised by Prof. Paul Barbara in the University of Texas at Austin and received Ph. D. in Physical Chemistry in 2007. He joined Link group at Rice University in 2007 as a postdoctoral researcher and promoted to a research fellow since 2012. He joined UMass Dartmouth in 2018. His research interest is to study optical properties of plasmonic nanomaterials at single particle level for the applications of renewable energy, optical sensing, and medical treatment. He has developed steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic techniques to investigate collective optical properties of plasmonic nanoparticles, plasmon-mediated chemistry, chiral plasmonics, and plasmon optomechanics. In the MUST program, he will develop high-sensitivity fluorescence imaging technique to probe the bacterial population in biofilm and explore novel nanomaterials to suppress the growth of biofilm.


Yanlai Chen

Associate Professor

Mathematics
Liberal Arts 394A

508-999-8438
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Yifei Li

Professor

Electrical & Computer Engineering
Science & Engineering 214E

508-999-8841
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Dr. Yifei Li received his B.Eng. in Optoelectronics from Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China, in 1996. He received his MS (2001) and PhD (2003) in Electrical Engineering both from Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA. From 2003 to 2007, he was a research faculty with the Center for Microwave-Lightwave Engineering, Drexel University. In 2007, he joined the ECE Department of the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, where he is currently a full professor and the director of the RF Photonics Lab. From 2013 to 2014, Dr. Li was a visiting faculty in the Optoelectronic Research Group of the University of California Santa Barbara. Dr. Li’s research interests includes RF photonics, photonic integrated circuits, coherent optical communications, RF devices and systems, and laser physics.

Dr. Li has five US patents in RF Photonics. He has numerous publications in renowned technical journals and international conference proceedings. Since he joined UMassD, he has led 8 competitive research projects funded from the Navy, Airforce and DARPA as the Principle investigator. Dr. Li was a winner of European Microwave Association (EuMA) Young Scientist Prize (1st prize) during the 12th Colloquium on Microwave Communications held in Budapest, Hungary. He was a winner of 2008 DARPA MTO Young Faculty Award.


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